Home Sweet Home – July 13th

Wolfville, Canning, Blomiden, Repeat

First the Rose´. Ever since I’ve had Patio 9 Pink and learned the LCBO doesn’t carry it anymore, I’ve been trying to find its equal. I’ve tried several Ontario wines; Lady Bug, Rose, and some bubbly sweet stuff. None of these I’ve been paying attention to what winery they’re from, though they are stacked in a holder in my kitchen in Toronto. Not like that’s going to help me now. The last rose´ wine I tried, however was from Muskoka Lakes Winery. I had one sip and declared that it was awful! I had another sip to make sure and after pulling face, I sipped once more for good measure. I have never tasted a wine so vinegary, tart and to put it mildly only good for cooking. But whoever heard of using a rose´ for cooking? Unless you were to make a salad dressing. I sincerely hope that the batch was bad and somehow it turned while enrute in the store or something. But I will not be recommending it to anyone, I’m sorry to say. What about Blomidon Rose´? Well, it was mildly floral in the beginning, but ended on a tart note, with the slightest hint of a vinegar. Keep in mind I’m comparing this with the Rockway Winery’s Patio Pink which was floral, very smooth with a mild, yet refreshing, taste of an English Blend tea. What can I say? Everything I’ve fallen in love with has been discontinued in stores. But I can always rent a car for the day and drive to Rockway. Hike some of the Bruce Trail and hit the winery.

There are two large dining room tables in the main house where Joan and her husband live. This is always set with antique cups and saucers. Breakfast is two slices of toast a poached egg in the middle, back bacon, coffee or tea, and juice. All for $3.50. You sit at one of the said tables with other guests who are willing to divulge who they are, what they do, why are the visiting, who their children are and ask the same questions in return which are always readily answered. This morning, I made some Muskoka coffee brought as a treat, thinking that Nova Scotia was not yet one with the Jones’s in this department. I was pleasantly surprised when Joan brought out a local blend that was pretty amazing. There is a Coffee Museum somewhere around here. If I remember, I’d like to visit it tomorrow, before or after out Magic Wine Bus tour. Then again we only have one more full day.

After breakfast we walked on an trail that ran atop one of the many dykes in Wolfville that were made centuries ago. They date back the the early 1700’s when a group of French Neutralist ,aka Acadians, came to Nova Scotia to settle. They made dykes to recede the ocean to create the fertile land we know today. There are many sections of the Annapolis valley you travel along where you technically are on the the ocean floor. We drove along one of these causeways on our way to Canning and eventually to Mount Blomidon. My main goal for traveling this way was to find boats docked at a warf at low tide. We passed one beyond Kingsport. I was blessed to be in the drivers seat today. I can tell you, I took full advantage of it. I stopped where I pleased though not so much as to piss my Mother or my Aunt off. Thankfully both understood and somewhat enjoyed the view or otherwise kept themselves preoccupied.

On the way back we stopped at Foxhill Cheese House, just outside of Port William’s. Their main line in the store at this time was about 8 different types of gouda, two types of cheddar and one feta. They had some of the cheeses cut for samples in dishes, when I came to the cheddar I was confused about which one was really the aged and which not. Perhaps the labels were mixed up. The 4 year old cheddar was so very creamy while the mild was dry and less moist. You’d think it would be the other way around. At least to us amateur cheese lovers. The girl at the counter was willing enough to give Mom and I a little tour. It was actually a talk. She brought us to a large window that looked into one of the processing rooms where another woman was cleaning up. When I asked our guide about the two cheddar cheeses, she said it was all a matter of how they processed it, though she wasn’t able to go into much detail and sadly, I forget most of what she said. It was another hot day. But what I do remember her saying about the milk is that they pasteurize it at a lower temperature so it doesn’t kill off all the bacteria, some of which, actually healthy to you. I use a similar example of hand sanitizer. If used excessively, it kills the good germs. She said that their milk is popular to those who may get ill from milk provided by larger corporations. An industry standard set long ago by the money grubbing bastards which diminished the sales of independent farms. Now they are making a come-back. One thing I’d like to point out and you can laugh at me for this, it won’t be the first time, is that there is a difference of taste between milk from Nova Scotia and milk from Ontario. Whatevs. Take it how you will.

At the begging of the trip, we all decided that we wanted to go to the Wolfville Farmers Market. There were’t many vendors. Most of them were food participating in the $10 meals. I can’t say for sure if this was for this particular Wednesday or every Wednesday. There was Pad Thai, Greek, Schnitzel, Moroccan, Pizza, and others. You pay your $10 and get something akin to Monopoly money in $2 increments. Salad and bread are free and after collecting this, you choose a vender for a main meal (we all chose to Moroccan) and another or the same for dessert. I had saffron chicken with rice that had cabbage, onion and chickpeas as a garnish. MMMMMMMMMmmmmmmmmm. When the owners asked how it was, I wasn’t kidding or exaggerating when I told them it was AMMMMMMMMMMAAAAAAAZING!!!!!!!!! Even Auntie Rie liked it and she it not the adventurous international foody type. Sorry Auntie Rie. I love you! We bought nothing more at the market, simply took our leftovers and left for Allen’s Motel where we ended the night with drinking, playing Phase 10 and golf.

At the end of the day we all agreed, that were we to live here, we would hover go to a grocery store, but travel from farm or farmers markets to buy our food. IN comparing them with Ontario prices, the cost to do this would’t be that bad at all!!

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